Cloud Services Leak Your Data

Big Brother is watching what you write. Chinese users working on the local equivalent of Google Docs discovered that there are some things you can’t write. An author was locked out of the novel she was writing, with the system telling her that she was trying to access “sensitive content.” It didn’t matter that she wrote herself.

Of course, Google would never lock you out of your Docs or Sheets. And they claim they don’t look at your documents to sell you ads, though plenty of users report spooky coincidences. The default setting in Microsoft producs is to enable “Connected Experiences.” That means your content is being sent to Microsoft servers for analysis. Microsoft claims no human looks at it.

Do you have guidelines and technical measures in place to prevent sensitive data leaking out of your organization through cloud services?

Are You Still Building Things That Don’t Scale Automatically?

There is no excuse for a modern system to be slow. I’m at a 5,000-people conference this week, and their official networking app is totally overloaded and almost unresponsive.

You might still have legacy systems with scalability issues, but everything you build today should be cloud-native. As a first-class citizen of the cloud, a modern app has access to automatic scaling, monitoring, robustness, and many other features.

Ask the architects building new systems in your organization about how the application will scale. If the answer is that it will scale automatically, good. If the answer is that somebody has to notice response time increasing and manually do anything, you are still building to the old paradigm.

Convenience vs Security

The convenience of Microsoft Azure come with some serious problems. It seemed like a good idea at the time to store your cloud service credentials in your on-premise identity management solution. With Microsoft Active Directory and Microsoft Azure, you got exactly that convenience.

The only problem is that when hackers get into your on-premise system, they own your cloud instances too. The US Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) has issued an alert about SolarWinds hackers using privilege escalation to gain access to the Microsoft Active Directory Federated Services (ADFS) and then producing OAuth tokens to move laterally to your cloud instances.

The SolarWinds hack shows that having intruders in your system is the new normal. You need to compartmentalize access, and storing all your access rights in one central place is a very dangerous convenience.

Future IT Leaders

The future IT leaders are coming from the cloud business. Jeff Bezos just announced he is stepping down as CEO, and the new CEO is Andy Jassy, who was running their cloud business. That business is a small part of Amazon’s turnover, but more than half their profits. At Microsoft, Satya Nadella was running Azure before he became CEO of Microsoft.

The next CIO in your organization is also going to be someone with experience running successful cloud-based solutions. And if you are an IT leader and looking to move up to larger things, you will need some cloud successes under your belt, too.

Just be aware that your career doesn’t just need cloud, it needs cloud solutions that provide significant business benefits without loss of flexibility. It is easy to rack up large cloud bills without anything to show for it, or to get locked into an inflexible cloud solutions. It is not easy to create successful cloud solutions. That’s why those who can will get ahead.